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If You Can Do This Simple Test In 60 Seconds, Your Heart Is in Good Shape




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Often times when measuring heart health, we are encouraged to seek a medical professional and perform expensive tests.

However, a new study highlighted by the European Society of Cardiology has found a simple and inexpensive way to assess heart health (1).

Dr. Jesus Peteiro from the University Hospital A Coruna, Spain states that if it takes more than one and a half minutes to...

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Tags: health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health,

The study assessed 165 patients who were suspected to have coronary heart disease.

These patients all had symptoms of chest pain or shortness of breath when exercising (1).

All of the participants walked or ran on a treadmill while intermittently increasing the intensity. When the patients were exhausted, their exercise capacity was measured in MET’s (1).

Then, all participants rested for 15-20 minutes until fully recovered, and then were asked to complete a stair-climbing test.

This test required the subjects to climb four flights of stairs.

All participants climbed 60 stairs, the same number of stairs as 4 flights.

None of the patients could run or stop during the test, and their times were recorded.

After their ascent, the researchers then looked at the test results and the relationship between MET’s and the time it took to climb the stairs.

Patients who climbed the stairs in less than 45 seconds achieved more than 9-10 MET’s (1).

Other studies have shown that 10 MET’s is linked to a low mortality rate.

On the other hand, participants who took 1.5 minutes or more to complete the required number of steps exerted less than 8 MET’s.

8 MET’s during an exercise test is linked to a higher mortality rate (1).

This study also looked at images of heart function during the treadmill test. It was shown that 58% of those who completed the stair test in more than 1.5 minutes also had abnormal heart function (1).

In contrast, only 32% of those who finished in under 45 seconds had abnormal heart function after the stair ascent (1).

Overall, Dr. Jesus Peteiro found that the significant correlation of the stair-climbing test time and exercise capacity could be translated to the general population.

In better terms, anyone can use this test to determine their current heart health.

Good Heart Health

Oftentimes, when we think of "good heart health", healthy eating and regular physical activity, come to mind.

While these are great, let’s take a deeper dive into the big impact of lifestyle changes to promote a lower risk of heart disease.

There are many factors that contribute to heart health.

For example, higher blood pressure, high cholesterol levels (blood fats), or abnormal heart rate can increase heart disease risk.

The American Heart Association (AHA) states that a healthy diet and lifestyle are the best weapons against cardiovascular disease (2).

Here are a few key ways to reduce the risk of heart disease:

Regular Physical Activity – Heart Health

Regular physical activity will help to increase the number of calories you burn each day.

Each week, aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise.

Physical activity can help to maintain weight, prevent obesity, and improve cardiovascular health.

If you cannot schedule a 30-minute workout into your day, try adding short bursts of exercise throughout your day.

Taking the stairs or walking during phone calls are both easy ways to increase the number of calories burned!

Overall Healthy Diet – Heart Health

A heart-healthy diet can lower the risk of heart disease and support long-term overall health.Limiting cholesterol levels and getting a good source of antioxidants and nutrient-rich foods is key in supporting a heart-healthy diet.

The American Heart Association suggests that an overall healthy eating pattern emphasizes:

  • Eat lots of fruits and vegetables without high-calorie sauces
  • Choose whole grains like barley, flaxseed, oats, quinoa or rice cakes
  • Choose foods with high dietary fiber (leafy greens)
  • Eat a variety of nuts and legumes ( whole beans, walnuts)
  • Choose a variety of fatty fish with high omega-3 (herring, mackerel, tuna, or sardines)
  • Low-fat dairy products
  • Healthy fats like olive oil and avocado (these provide a good source of cholesterol)
  • Limit alcohol consumption and drink in moderation
  • Avoid cooking with too much salt to limit inflammation. Consider using a salt substitute!
  • When eating out, pay close attention to portion sizes!

Additionally, limiting saturated fat, trans fat, sodium and choosing lean meat and poultry can reduce the risk of heart attack, and promote healthy blood pressure (2).

Daily Aspirin Therapy

An interesting, and commonly used, form of therapy is taking an aspirin each day.

Aspirin works to prevent clotting in your blood. This can help blood flow freely through your arteries and prevent a stroke (5).

If you have high cholesterol or atherosclerosis, this may be beneficial.

However, consult your doctor and pharmacist before taking any medication.

Risk of Heart Disease

For many reasons, heart-healthy foods and regular exercise can keep us healthy.

Without these two factors, our health can rapidly decline.

Heart disease is the number one leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, according to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) (3).

Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease. Coronary heart disease is caused by a buildup of plaque in the walls of your arteries.

When the plaque builds up over time, it can narrow the artery and restrict blood flow. This is called atherosclerosis.

If the coronary arteries cannot supply the heart with blood, there is a high risk of heart failure and stroke.

Along with atherosclerosis, high cholesterol increases the chance of heart attack and stroke.

Cholesterol is used to build healthy cells, but too much LDL or bad cholesterol can worsen your artery condition, and damage the blood vessels.

Too much buildup of cholesterol can obstruct blood flow, and increase blood pressure, another cause of heart disease.

Another factor to look out for is triglycerides.

Triglycerides are a type of fat in the blood that is composed of glycerol and a trio of fatty acids.

  • It lowers cholesterol levels
  • It helps you prevent and control diabetes
  • Researches have proven that okra can help kidney diseases
  • It promotes immunity
  • It helps with asthma symptoms
  • Lowers the amount of glucose absorbed from food

The following recipe will provide the best way to get all the amazing benefits of okra. In addition, it will help you balance the levels of sugar in your blood in a completely natural way. Plus, it will boost your organism and restore its health at its best.

  1. Pale Complexion

The absence of Vitamin B12 in our body usually makes the face pale. In case your face gets paler every day, check your tongue as well, and if it’s smooth, you are definitely deficient in this vitamin. Other symptoms may include fatigue and memory loss.

Healing Foods: Salmon, red meat, fortified cereal, yogurt, and swiss cheese.

  1. Puffy Eyes

You will probably notice if your eyes are puffy after waking up, that’s a sign of iodine lacking in your body. Other signs include brittle nails, weight gain, and dry skin.

Healing Foods: Cranberries, kelp, strawberries, potatoes, yogurt, and navy beans.

  1. Painful or Bleeding Gum

The lack of Vitamin C results in painful, tender, and bleeding gums. Since this vitamin is crucial for overall health, its deficiency can lead to numerous health ailments. Keep in mind that the human body doesn’t make or store vitamin C, so you need to get plenty from your food every day.

Healing Foods: Strawberries, citrus fruits, berries, mango, cantaloupe, watermelon, kiwi, papaya, and red peppers.

  1. Hair issues

If your hair seems lifeless, dry, brittle, and you have dandruff, your body lacks Vitamin B7. Doses of biotin via vitamin supplements can be helpful for improving hair quality and even the treatment of diabetes.

Healing Foods: Eggs, mushrooms, and cauliflower, almonds, nuts, legumes, and whole grains.

  1. Pale Lips

If your lips are pale, it means your body is low in iron. Make sure to treat this issue as soon as possible as iron deficiency can weaken your immune system.

1. Promotes Strong Bones and Teeth

One of the primary reasons to incorporate milk into your diet is its role in promoting strong bones and teeth. Milk is an excellent source of calcium, a mineral crucial for maintaining bone health. It works in synergy with vitamin D, which helps the body absorb calcium effectively. By ensuring an adequate intake of milk, you can support the growth and development of healthy bones and teeth.

2. Aids in Muscle Growth and Repair

If you engage in regular physical activity or exercise, milk can be your ally in achieving optimal muscle growth and repair. Milk contains high-quality proteins, including casein and whey protein, which are known for their role in muscle development. These proteins provide the essential amino acids required for repairing and building muscle tissue. Including milk in your post-workout routine can aid in faster recovery and improved muscle strength.

3. Boosts Immune System

A robust immune system is essential for warding off illnesses and maintaining overall health. Milk contains various nutrients, such as antioxidants and vitamins (including vitamin A and vitamin D), which play a vital role in strengthening the immune system. Regular consumption of milk can support the body’s defense mechanisms, helping you stay healthy and combat infections more effectively.

4. Supports Healthy Weight Management

If you are looking to maintain a healthy weight, milk can be a valuable addition to your diet. The protein and fat content in milk contributes to a feeling of satiety, reducing the likelihood of overeating. Moreover, studies have shown that milk can help boost metabolism, leading to better weight management. By including milk as a part of your balanced diet, you can support your weight loss or weight maintenance goals.

5. Provides Essential Nutrients

Milk is not only rich in calcium but also packed with a range of essential nutrients. It contains vitamins such as vitamin B12, which is necessary for red blood cell formation, and vitamin B2 (riboflavin), which aids in energy metabolism. Additionally, milk provides minerals like phosphorus, potassium, and magnesium, all of which are vital for various bodily functions. Including milk in your daily routine can help ensure you receive a wholesome mix of essential nutrients.

6. Improves Hydration

Staying adequately hydrated is crucial for overall health and well-being. While water is the primary source of hydration, milk can also contribute to your daily fluid intake. With its high water content, milk can help quench thirst and provide hydration. In fact, studies have shown that milk is even more effective in maintaining proper hydration than popular sports drinks. So, next time you feel thirsty, consider reaching for a glass of milk.Tags: health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health, health, nutrition, diets, heart disease, diabetes, aging, longevity, senior health, mental health, woman's health, newsbreak, health,

This FanPost was written by a member of the Gaslamp Ball community and does not necessarily reflect the views of the Gaslamp Ball staff or SB Nation.